MENU

NCSF Blog

Results: 25 posts

Exercises for Connecting the Kinetic Chain

December 09, 2014 by NCSF 0 comments

Isolated exercises can be useful for maximizing specific muscle activation, but many clients will obtain greater benefits from the steady inclusion of compound, multi-joint exercises that connect cooperative force couples across the kinetic chain. Cross-joint, closed-kinetic chain lifts are advantageous for promoting maximal muscle activation and caloric expenditure, enhancing stabilizer muscle strength/endurance, and improving how well cooperative body segments work together during functional movements. Body segment connectivity can be improved with exercises that effectively connect the sling systems through the refinement of motor patterning and neural synchronicity. Lifts that connect segments of the kinetic chain can also serve to improve muscle balance and absolute force/power output potential over time. Muscles that work cooperatively produce more force than those that work in isolation.

The Psychological Impact of “Turkey Day”: What happened to Thanksgiving?

November 25, 2014 by NCSF 0 comments

Thanksgiving is here, and so follows vast images of food. While historically a feast was the foundation for a celebration of giving thanks – it is unlikely the forefathers envisioned what has turned out to be the greatest national caloric imbalance. This emphasis on eating for the holiday is well reflected in its common nickname - Turkey Day. Thanksgiving is undoubtedly a time for gathering with family and friends for a meal dutifully prepared by the host to show their care for those whom the meal is shared. Appreciation for the effort given in preparing such an extravagant meal is clearly demonstrated, as many people eat to discomfort. Psychological sciences professor Don Saucier of Kansas State University says the over-indulgence is due to society’s shift in vision, from simply gathering together for social enrichment to eating a large meal, for social validation.

Optimal Exercise Pairs for Improved Shoulder Mobility and Muscle Activation

November 16, 2014 by NCSF 0 comments

Many clients seeking personal training services demonstrate poor flexibility in the shoulder complex as well as dysfunction in muscle activation patterns due to functional decline. In some cases, level 1 and 2 postural distortions have changed the function of the shoulder due to weakness and tightness from an assortment of contributing factors. Sometimes these issues cause pain, instability and movement limitations often observed during postural and movement analysis. The most common contributing factors are often cumulative; including, myofascial restrictions, loss of functional movement range, and muscle strength imbalances. All of these factors promote dysfunction in the scapular plane with consequent shoulder complex inefficiencies. Personal trainers can employ a number of tools to restore function and movement performance in clients with these issues, but an easy start is to establish improved muscle relationships..

Top Reasons Why People Fail in their Exercise Programs

October 15, 2014 by NCSF 0 comments

Successfully reaching most fitness goals takes time, effort and dedication; concepts that are becoming seemingly foreign in today’s “I want it now” culture. For example, losing fat or gaining muscle are both generally slow processes that require notable caloric expenditure, intelligent caloric intake and specific exercise stresses. Many people love to entertain the thought of pursuing such goals, but when it comes down to taking on the actual work that must be engaged, as well as setting realistic objectives - the allure of the challenge can quickly dissipate. Poor exercise adherence or completely giving up on a fitness goal is often based on physiological and psychological factors that limit success.

Common Misconceptions of Fat Loss

October 01, 2014 by NCSF 0 comments

Fat loss is one of the most common goals among individuals seeking personal training services. Most trainers know that a multifactorial approach is best when attempting to help a client lose fat in a safe and expedient fashion. The training program itself must focus on maximal caloric expenditure. Concurrent nutritional modifications must promote a negative caloric balance while still preserving macro/micronutrient adequacy for health and lean mass conservation. Fat loss is obtainable for all clients, albeit at varying rates depending on their physical condition or any limitations/special needs; but proper protocol must be followed to facilitate ideal results. The first step in this process is to filter through the various misconceptions surrounding fat loss to ensure all efforts help drive the client toward their ultimate goal.

Cotton vs Polyester: What to Wear to Reduce Body Odor

September 09, 2014 by NCSF 0 comments

It is well known that numerous forms of bacteria thrive inside the human body. For example, it has been estimated that about five pounds of bacteria reside within the intestinal tract of a healthy adult. Unfortunately, our coexistence with microorganisms does not end there, as bacteria also flourish on every inch of the skin. These bacteria propagate in varying quantities in different areas; about 100 bacteria live within each square centimeter on one’s forearm, versus 10 million per square centimeter in the armpits, navel, groin, and spaces between the toes. These colonies have a large role in the development of body odor when an individual sweats, even though perspiration in itself is known to be sterile and not produce foul odors. New research shows that it is primarily the environment we provide for these microbe havens (in the form of clothing) that has a major impact on the development/severity of embarrassing aromas.

Enzyme Supplements – Pros and Cons

September 03, 2014 by NCSF 0 comments

Consumers are increasingly turning to over-the-counter (OTC) enzyme supplements based on the belief that they can aid digestion and improve overall health. However, as with most supplements, research has demonstrated minimal positive results when compared to anecdotal data. In clinical settings, enzyme supplements are prescribed for individuals suffering from issues that impact digestive function, such as pancreas dysfunction. Conversely, OTC enzymes such as bromelain or papain (derived from pineapples and papaya respectively) are readily consumed by healthy individuals.

New Gluten-free Labelling is going into Effect

August 18, 2014 by NCSF 0 comments

New legislation is making “gluten-free” labelling more stringent. This marks the end of a year-long period of adjustment that companies were given to reduce the gluten content in food items labelled “gluten-free” to 20 parts per million. The rationale behind 20 parts per million is at this density, the majority of individuals with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity will not suffer an inflammatory reaction.

Low Iron? 13 Warning Signs You Might be Deficient

August 11, 2014 by NCSF 0 comments

Despite iron being a key mineral in the formation of oxygen-binding molecules within the body, iron deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency in the world. In fact, approximately 30-50% of the adult female population is believed to be iron deficient. Dietary iron comes in two natural forms; non-heme iron found in plant-based foods (2-10% absorption rate), and heme-iron found in animal products (10-30% absorption rate). Heme-iron is known to have the highest bioavailability, even when compared to iron supplements.

What is Your Heart’s “Real” Age?

August 04, 2014 by NCSF 0 comments

The phrase “dog years” is often used by veterinarians and pet lovers. When used it is intended to refer to the correlation between a dog reaching maturity and aging – providing an easy comparison to human aging. But when it comes to your heart, is there such a thing as “heart years”? Cardiovascular research has pointed to the use of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) scores to indicate heart age. The IMT (measured in mm) is based on average plaque thickness, and has been directly correlated with age. For example, average scores start at 0.56 mm, at age 40, and subsequently increase to 0.65 mm, 0.74 mm and 0.80 mm as age increases to 50, 60 and 65 years respectively. However, lifestyle factors can greatly increase or decrease an individual’s IMT score at any age.